Dispersing ideas with PRISMA

By Danielle Sendou Ringgit
@danitbpseeds

 

MAHATMA GANDHI once said: “I want freedom for the full expression of my personality.”

With ‘autobiography’ as their theme, final year University Teknologi Mara (UiTM) Sarawak in Kota Samarahan Fine Arts students expressed their feelings, life and experience through their art at the PRISMA “Dispersing of Ideas” exhibition at Hills Shopping Mall from October 18th to 19th.

 

Motion and movement!

 

Muhammad Haziq, 20, depicted his passion for dancing by capturing his dance movements and expressing them through a variety of media.

His biographical art piece can be seen enhanced by his liberal usage of multiple and eye-popping colours as well as their focus on facial expression.

 

Muhammad Haziq  next to his work art, 'Chain Movement' Series II.

Muhammad Haziq next to his work art, ‘Chain Movement’ Series II.

 

To express how hip-hop dancing is about pushing the boundaries and going with the flow, Haziq also uses unconventional art materials like an ordinary plastic mat we might use on an ordinary basis as his canvas. The idea of going with the flow is best captured in ‘Top Rock in Motion’ where he related how a drop of paint that accidentally dripped onto the canvas was then incorporated into the painting instead.

 

'Top Rock In Motion', an accident with paint gets incorporated into the painting.

‘Top Rock In Motion’

Chain Movement which is made out aluminium that was cut into multiple pieces before assembled together

Chain Movement is made out of strips of aluminium and reassembled to capture the motion and energy of dance.

 

In ‘Chain Movement’, he uses aluminium cut into ribbons and then bent and shaped into outlines of figures dancing. Set against the stark white background, the viewer can enjoy studying the flow and energy of the body from one move to the next.

Citing Bayu Utomo Radjikin, a local artist from Sabah as his inspiration, Haziq incorporates Bayu’s style or technique in his artwork which puts much focus on the face. Like Bayu, Haziq depicts facial expression in his work which can be seen in his art piece, Dance Expression.

 

Soldier Boy

 

Coming from a family with a military background, Alsah Allam Dangkulap from Sabah portrays his ambition of becoming a soldier proudly serving his country in military-themed paintings and sculptures.

“Most of my family members are soldiers, and that is how that influences my ambition of becoming one too,” said Alsah.

 

Alsah posing in front of his art work which portrays his ambition to become a soldier.

Alsah posing in front of his art work which portrays his ambition to become a soldier.

 

The life-sized paintings of himself standing like a soldier holding a weapon with a big dreamy grin on his face in differing situations show how the military is not far from his mind in everything he does. Alsah used bitumen, pastel and charcoal for his art work.

Aside from the facial expression, the warm colours he used in his artwork clearly convey Alsah’s happiness and anticipation in following in his family’s footsteps to become a soldier.

 

Alsah’s sculpture imagining himself as a soldier.

Alsah’s sculpture imagining himself as a soldier.

 

A Mother’s Love

 

Ever since he was little, Sudir Amruddin of Sabah has always been interested in art especially drawing portraits of those he is close to.

The second of six siblings, Sudir has a close relationship with his mother and when opportunity presented itself, he took the chance to feature his mother as the main subject in his work.

 

6. Sudir’s standing next to his art piece depicting his mother in the kitchen (My Mother’s Kitchen) where she prepared food for family

Sudir’s standing next to his art piece depicting his mother in the kitchen (My Mother’s Kitchen) where she prepares food for family

 

“What she says and does, also reflects on me,” explained Sudir on why he chose his mother as his main subject in his portraits.

Besides his mother’s portrait, Sudir also drew her in the kitchen (My Mother’s Kitchen) where she cooks for the family and also where he would be helping her with the housework when he’s at home, symbolised by his glasses in the painting set right next to the cooking pot.

 

MOTHER’S LOVE: A portrait of Sudir’s mother (Mother and Child) who is the main subject in his work

A portrait of Sudir’s mother in ‘Mother and Child’, the main subject in his work

 

In his work, he uses the technique of repetition by arranging the forks in an alternating pattern to represent her repeated effort and love for her children. Looking closer at his artwork, onlookers may also notice that Sudir painted his mother’s portrait on a piece of cloth in ‘My Mother’s Kitchen’ to present the soft and feminine side of a woman.

 

Salute!

 

Once upon a time, tough girl Dayang Siti Aishah was used to everyone calling her tough as she always participated in physically challenging activities such as the police cadets. While that did not bother her much, it wasn’t until somebody commented ‘You are tough, are you even a girl?’ that she took the liberty of expressing herself in her artwork.

Choosing her marching experience during National Service as one of her main themes, Dayang’s art work centres around a pair of marching boots as her subject through which she portrays herself, a tough girl who has a feminine side.

 

8. EMPOWERED: Dayang Siti standing between her art work The Boot Pass Memories (left) and The Camouflage of a Woman (right).

EMPOWERED: Dayang Siti standing between her art work The Boot Pass Memories (left) and The Camouflage of a Woman (right).

 

“In my art work ‘The Camouflage of a Woman, I am trying to portray myself as tough on the outside, which can be seen in the military, but on the inside, is a woman,’ Dayang said, explaining that the marching boots represented the tougher side of her, while the intricate floral design on the boots symbolise her softer side.

The art piece is divided by a black border, where the upper part which is the presented by bright colours represent the feminine side of Dayang while the lower part represent the toughness of a woman. Aside from that, Dayang also used a metal plate to show her tough side with marching figures in red.

If you look closer at the painting, the marching figures along the bottom of the painting are repeated in the background. Dayang used the stencil method – which is something like printing – to reproduce the patterns on the canvas.

 

Dayang’s sculpture installation of her boots marching made of Plaster of Paris was inspired by her marching experience during National Service.

Dayang’s sculpture installation of her boots marching made of Plaster of Paris was inspired by her marching experience during National Service.

 

Coming home

 

With Kampong Patau-Patau I in Labuan as her source of inspiration, Nor Aziennah Abdul Rahim is proud to show off her beloved hometown to the public, where she feels she can relax and be happy. At night, Nor Azzieannah said the view from her village is especially beautiful at night and she even can see the town of Labuan.

“In my village, ‘patau’ actually refers to the buoy that is usually attached to the side of the boat,” explained Nor Aziennah, giving the meaning behind the name of her village.

 

10. Nor Azieannah inspiration for her artwork came from her hometown, Kampong Patau-Patau

Nor Azieannah’s inspiration for her artwork came from her hometown, Kampong Patau-Patau

 

A fishing village, Kampong Patau-Patau is famous for its houses built over the sea and this can be seen in Nor Azieannah’s art work. Aside from that, she incorporates physical items such as buoys and fishing nets in her art pieces to bring out the realism in her paintings.

 

11. Nor Azieannah’s painting titled The Patau-Patau Symbolic

Nor Azieannah’s painting titled The Patau-Patau Symbolic

 

Tawau-Nunukan

 

Hailing from Tawau, Mohammad Razif S. Jamaluddin’s artwork raises the issue of illegal immigration happening in his town, an ongoing situation which makes him concerned and fearful.

 

12. Mohammad Razif expressing his concern over the matter of illegal immigrants in his hometown of Tawau

Mohammad Razif expresses his concern over the matter of illegal immigration in his hometown of Tawau in his artwork.

 

“Jalan Apas Batu 4 is the name of the place where the illegal immigrants always hang out,” explained Razif. His fears are explored in a series of panels where he displays sites like Jalan Apas Batu 4, the ‘petek-petek’ (boat) Indonesian immigrants use to cross over to Tawau from Nunukan, a regency of North Kalimantan province and even his own frustration and fearfulness over the situation in a drawing of himself crouching while holding his head.

 

His concern and frustration enveloping him in this drawing

His concern and frustration enveloping him in this self-portrait.

14. The yellow bus at a bus station in Jalan Apas Batu 4 where the illegal immigrants can always be seen hanging around

The yellow bus at a bus station in Jalan Apas Batu 4 where the illegal immigrants can always be seen hanging around.

13. Drawing of the face of an illegal immigrant by Mohammad Razif which he found from an old newspaper

A portrait of an illegal immigrant that was published in a newspaper.

 

To emphasise the reality of the dangers, he incorporates a newspaper cutting about a man who survived an attack from an illegal immigrant who used a ‘titik’ weapon on him.

While yellow is the reigning colour theme in his panel illustrations, in his particular portrait it represents his happiness being engulfed in darkness, emblemised by the stark black colour.

This exhibition constitutes their final year project before they graduate in May 2015.

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