The Invisible Beauty

By Emmanuel Osakue

 

The jumping spider is so little that we accidentally crush them under our feet, but if we could see the minor details in the spider, we will love them.

 

The desire to make images appealing is one of Philip Chen’s goals as a designer. Through microphotography, Philip brings the hiding structure of the simple jumping spider into the limelight in his photo collection, ‘The Invisible Beauty’, unveiling the beauty in nature around us.

The jumping spider belongs to the family of Salticidae and contains more than 500 described genera and about 5,000 described species making it the largest family of spiders. Though they are rarely noticeable because of their minute nature, they are commonly found in waterlogged areas in suburb communities of Sarawak.

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“As the saying goes, ‘Beauty is in eyes of the beholder’ but we need to observe things before we can attribute beauty to them,” reiterated Philip, “The jumping spider is so little that we accidentally crush them under our feet, but if we could see the minor details in the spider, we will love them.”

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Some of these species are really amazing with their bulging and telescopic eyes supported with sword-like fangs that suggest alien figures in Hollywood science fiction movie scene. One will but wonder the magnificent work of nature from the color display and body structures of this creature which ordinarily would not be visible with our eyes.

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Philip Chen is a fresh Graphic Design graduate of Limkokwing Institute of Creative Technology who has gained interest in photographic technology.  Philip uses photography to record and study movements, such as the study of human and animal locomotion in his surroundings. He has won awards in photography competitions around the state of Sarawak.

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